What Does ‘Advanced Monitoring Equipment’ Mean on a Vets’ Website, and is it Important?

Home » All Posts » New vet » What Does ‘Advanced Monitoring Equipment’ Mean on a Vets’ Website, and is it Important?

Modern anesthesia methods in human hospitals have come a long way from getting a patient drunk or just pinning them down by strong assistants, and thankfully veterinary medicine is just as advanced. As well as modern drugs, techniques and protocols, some own practices also boast that they have ‘advanced monitoring equipment’. What is this equipment? What is it used for?

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Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, pt 5: advanced life support

Advanced life support (ALS) can only be initiated once basic life support (BLS) has begun. Where BLS refers to the initial stages of intubation, ventilation and chest compression, ALS is the advanced stage where vasopressors, positive inotropes, anticholinergics, correction of electrolyte disturbances, volume deficits, severe anemia and defibrillation are performed. This is an important aspect … Read more

CAW launches first Advanced Veterinary Nursing Congress

The College of Animal Welfare (CAW) is set to launch its first Advanced Veterinary Nursing Congress later this year. The congress, set to take place on September 1, is a one-day virtual event that will explore advanced professional practice, focusing on advanced veterinary nursing skills and knowledge. First of its kind The event, sponsored by … Read more

Mom Becomes “Guide Dog” After Her Pup Develops Advanced Cataracts

Dogs are incredible, and we love them so much that we are willing to do whatever they need to live their best lives. In fact, one devoted dog mom went above and beyond, becoming a “pseudo guide dog” for her beloved Cocker Spaniel Molly, who suffered from hyper-mature cataracts as she aged. But once her … Read more

What is the difference between a Specialist and an Advanced Practitioner vet?

Home » All Posts » New vet » What is the difference between a Specialist and an Advanced Practitioner vet?

To become a Veterinary Surgeon, you must complete 5 years of an intensive academic course. Many people adore their years in university and the profession is continuing to promote veterinary medicine to a diverse range of students. However, it may surprise you to learn that after years of education, many Veterinary Surgeons go on to do many more years of further study.

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