Leafy greens first dished up 3,500 years ago – BIOENGINEER.ORG

FRANKFURT. Over 450 prehistoric pots were examined, 66 of which contained traces of lipids, that is, insoluble substances in water. On behalf of the Nok research team at Goethe University, chemists from the University of Bristol extracted lipid profiles, aiming to reveal which plants were used. The results are now published in “Archaeological and Anthropological … Read more

NYU Tandon cybersecurity expert wins NSF CAREER Award for improving software vulnerability testing & education – BIOENGINEER.ORG

BROOKLYN, New York, Thursday, January 27 2022 —The National Science Foundation (NSF) has selected the NYU Tandon School of Engineering researcher who is developing better ways to assess vulnerability discovery tools and the most promising young academics. BROOKLYN, New York, Thursday, January 27 2022 —The National Science Foundation (NSF) has selected the NYU Tandon School … Read more

A game changer in water electrolysis technology for production of green hydrogen energy – BIOENGINEER.ORG

Recently, hydrogen has gained considerable attention as a potential clean energy resource to replace fossil fuels. In particular, there has been active research and development of water electrolysis technology that removes hydrogen from water to generate green energy and avoid greenhouse gas emissions. The proton exchange membrane water electrolyzer (PEMWE) technology, which is currently present … Read more

Solving a superconducting mystery with more precise computations – BIOENGINEER.ORG

Researchers have known about high-temperature superconducting copper-based materials, or cuprates, since the 1980s. Below a certain temperature (approximately -130 degree Celsius), electrical resistance vanishes from these materials and magnetic flux fields are expelled. However, the basis for that superconductivity continues to be debated and explored. Researchers have known about high-temperature superconducting copper-based materials, or cuprates, … Read more

Illuminating how solvent additives improve efficiency – BIOENGINEER.ORG

Ikoma, Japan – All-polymer blend solar cells are expected to play an important role in the transition to clean energy technologies because they can easily be produced in large-scale flexible sheets. However, their performance has lagged behind that of more traditional silicon alternatives, as well as other organic solar cells. Ikoma, Japan – All-polymer blend … Read more

Peruvian gold rush turns pristine rainforests into heavily polluted mercury sinks – BIOENGINEER.ORG

DURHAM, NC – If you had to guess which part of the world has the highest levels of atmospheric mercury pollution, you probably wouldn’t choose a piece of Amazonian rainforest as new. And yet, that’s exactly where they are. DURHAM, NC – If you had to guess which part of the world has the highest … Read more

Microbes help hibernating animals recycle nutrients, maintain muscle through winter – BIOENGINEER.ORG

MADISON, Wis. — To go through a long winter without food, hibernating animals — such as lined ground squirrel 13 — can slow down their metabolism by as much as 99 percent, but they still need important nutrients like proteins to maintain muscle while they’re hibernating. A new study by the University of Wisconsin-Madison shows … Read more

Caribou and Muskoxen buffer climate impacts for rare plants – BIOENGINEER.ORG

Being common is rather unusual. Spending its existence in small densities throughout its range. Inspired by a 15-year study in arctic Greenland from the University of California, Davis. Being common is rather unusual. Spending its existence in small densities throughout its range. Inspired by a 15-year study in arctic Greenland from the University of California, … Read more

Geoff Wehmeyer wins CAREER Award – BIOENGINEER.ORG

NEWS RELEASE Jeff Falk713-348-6775[email protected] Mike Williams713-348-6728[email protected] Geoff Wehmeyer wins CAREERS AwardNational Science Foundation supports developments in nanoparticle temperature mapping HOUSTON – (January 27, 2022) – Geoff Wehmeyer and his research group use Rice University electron microscopes to deepen understanding of nanoscale heat transfer and improve the performance of products ranging from transistors to light emitting … Read more

Coral skeleton formation rate determines resilience to acidifying oceans – BIOENGINEER.ORG

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 1/27/22 CONTACT: Pupa Gilbert, [email protected] READ ON THE WEB: https://news.wisc.edu/coral-skeleton-formation-rate-determines-resilience-to-acidifying-oceans/ DOWNLOADS: https://uwmadison.box.com/v/coral-skeletons-uw Coral skeleton formation rate determines the acidification of oceans MADISON, Wis. — A new study by the University of Wisconsin-Madison has implications for predicting coral reef survival and developing mitigation strategies to prevent ocean acidification weakening their bony skeletons. Although … Read more